The Future of Gender-Specific Medicine

The Future of Gender-Specific Medicine

Gender specificity plays a crucial role in the way disease affects one’s body. Researchers have found distinct differences in drug kinetics and dynamics in the body. However, they are often not accounted for. Examples include the fact that women, compared to men, have decreased gastrointestinal motility, larger fat stores, slower glomerular filtration rates and a decelerated… Read more

Student Feature – Veronica Reynoso

Student Feature – Veronica Reynoso

Veronica Reynoso is a junior at John F. Kennedy High School in La Palma, California. In her free time, she enjoys reading, playing the piano, and practicing karate. However, unlike most high school students, Veronica is also an avid scientific researcher and inventor and has already developed several projects dealing with limited materials and renewable… Read more

Climate Change and Inuit Tribes

Climate Change and Inuit Tribes

One of the most ubiquitous talks of the 21st century is about climate change. Among the vast inventions of mankind that range from gargantuan to dwarfed scopes of life, climate change bears an egregious blot. Michael Crichton, in his famous book Jurassic Park, states the significance of this issue: “…the earth would survive our folly,… Read more

Doctors in Massachusetts Slowly Overuse Antibiotics

Doctors in Massachusetts Slowly Overuse Antibiotics

In the early days of medicine, when doctors were first beginning to discover the power of antibiotics, there was minimal control on how antibiotics were distributed to patients. However, in recent times, doctors have realized that the overuse of antibiotics is creating superviruses that are increasingly resistant to the power of modern medicines. New drugs cannot… Read more

Homo Naledi: a New Human Relative?

Homo Naledi: a New Human Relative?

Deep in the Rising Star cave of Africa in 2013, two recreational cavers, Steven Tucker and Rick Hunter, were climbing through the rocks hoping to come across an interesting passage. They wiggled through the tight spaces in an area called the Superman’s Crawl, where the position of the body has to be perfect to slip through… Read more

The Revolution of Plastic-Eaters

The Revolution of Plastic-Eaters

The accumulation of trash, especially plastic, over the last century is becoming an important issue regarding the pollution of the landscape. Moreover, it is causing a problem in terms of harming biodiversity. The thing is, plastic has always had a great role in economic development. We can do nearly everything with this material. But, what if… Read more

Revival of the Past

Revival of the Past

The brain consists of three main parts: the cerebrum, the cerebellum and the brainstem. The cerebrum is responsible for interpreting touch, vision, hearing, speech, reasoning, emotions and learning. The cerebellum is located under the cerebrum and coordinates muscle movements and allows for a person to maintain posture and balance. The brainstem includes the midbrain, pons… Read more

The Flight (and Fight) of Hummingbirds

The Flight (and Fight) of Hummingbirds

A dazzling jewel zooms by, floating mid-air using wings beating 70 times each second. She stops next to a trumpet-shaped flower, which fits her elongated beak like a custom-made glove. These co-evolved creatures, the bird and the plant, work together to ensure the existence of each other. But this lock-and-key maneuver is only one of… Read more

HIV/AIDS 101

HIV/AIDS 101

What is HIV? HIV stands for Human Immunodeficiency Virus, which is a virus that attacks the immune system. This virus destroys mostly T-helper cells and other CD4+ white blood cells. Viruses cannot multiply outside the host cells, and most replicate infinitely inside the cell as soon as they enter until the cell is overwhelmed and… Read more

Quorum Sensing: A New Method to Attack Bacteria

Quorum Sensing: A New Method to Attack Bacteria

Bacteria are unicellular organisms that are able to cause infections within humans and, in some cases, they may be deadly. When these microscopic organisms become resistant to antibiotics, they are very persistent. You see, due to natural selection, eventually, as the effectiveness of antibiotics diminish, resistant strains emerge. These resistant strains reproduce and, suddenly, we… Read more