Posts Categorized: The Blog

Adaptation To Cancer: The Body Fighting Back

Adaptation To Cancer: The Body Fighting Back

Whether it be through our personal experiences with our own bodies or through our family members, we have all been touched by cancer. We have all been hurt and taunted by it, and finally, the body has put its foot down. It has begun to adapt. In a recent study conducted at Yale University, researchers… Read more

Cancer Resistance in Elephants

Cancer Resistance in Elephants

Elephants have nearly one hundred times more cells than humans, and are known for their long lifespans of sixty years on average. Yet surprisingly, only an estimated 5% of elephants die of cancer compared to about 12% of humans. Why is it that elephants have significantly lower cancer rates, especially considering their huge size and… Read more

Understanding Radiation

Understanding Radiation

“The ability to perceive or think differently is more important than the knowledge gained.” -David Bohm, a theoretical physicist of the 20th century On February 23, 1941, American chemist Glenn T. Seaborg and his colleagues identified plutonium as a new element at the University of California, Berkeley. However, in 1986, near the end of the Anti-Nuclear Movement, the… Read more

Intermittent Fasting and Increased Longevity

Intermittent Fasting and Increased Longevity

In the past, various research experiments have found that placing mice on extreme, low-calorie diets increased their longevity and reduced susceptibility to age-related diseases. Applying these findings to humans has been impractical as few would be willing to under-eat for their entire lives. Additionally, it is difficult to predict any other issues that may arise from a… Read more

Simulating Brain Microcircuitry

Simulating Brain Microcircuitry

In a recent study from the Blue Brain Project, a team of 82 researchers led by neuroscientist Henry Markram created one of the most detailed digital reconstructions of the brain. This reconstruction lends insight into the role of the neocortex and brain activity during sleep, memory formation, and neurological disorders. The study simulated 30,000 rat… Read more

Oysters: Revitalizing the Obsolete

Oysters: Revitalizing the Obsolete

Meet Emma Johnson. She is a sophomore at the University of Florida, majoring in Environmental Engineering. Emma is involved in some student opportunities on campus, such as field research on Sapelo Island in Georgia with graduate students, and an in-depth study of Spanish Moss. Her most recent project is saving the Oyster population. When I… Read more

Cerebral Organoids – Miniature Brains?

Cerebral Organoids – Miniature Brains?

In recent years, the use of cerebral organoids in neuroscience research has become increasingly popular. Barely pearl-sized, cerebral organoids are brain-imitating models that resemble human brains during the first trimester of embryonic development. Neuroscientists may now use these models to gain insight into scientific mysteries, such as neurogenesis and neurological disorders like dementia and schizophrenia. Cerebral organoids… Read more

Unique Personal Microbial Clouds

Unique Personal Microbial Clouds

According to a new study, we are all more like the Peanuts character, Pigpen, than we thought. The study, lead by Adam Altrichter from the University of Oregon, found that we are constantly emitting bacteria by shedding our skin and hair and by breathing – a million bacteria per hour. Trillions of bacteria call each… Read more

Breakthrough Research for Treatment of Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

Breakthrough Research for Treatment of Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

When traditional cancer treatment is unsuccessful, is there another option? Researchers from Harvard Medical School at Massachusetts General Hospital have found a potential answer to this question as related to recurrent chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer. Their research focuses on the use of Mullerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS), a gonadal hormone secreted during male embryonic development to prevent… Read more

Mars One: Becoming Martians

Mars One: Becoming Martians

On July 20th, 1969, Neil Armstrong spoke the famous words, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”. He was the first human being to set foot on the moon, making him America’s symbol for space travel for decades to come. However, by the year 2026, that accomplishment may be surpassed by… Read more